The Inter-American Development Bank’s innovation lab, IDB Lab, invested $750,000 in Talently, a startup dedicated to training and connecting Latin American tech talent with international companies. With this amount, the Peruvian company has already raised a total of US$5 million in financing.

The startup said in a press release that it will seek to be the largest tech talent marketplace in Latin America. In addition, it will seek to boost the access and participation of women in the technology field, as currently, only 16% of its total participants are women.

Talently expects to benefit nearly 160,000 professionals in Latin America, allocating at least 40,000 positions to women. “With this figure, we would be pretty solid,” Domenica Obando, CEO of Talently, told Contxto.

Cristian Vega, CTO; Domenica Obando, CEO; and Roxana Kern, COO. (Photo: Talently)

 

“In the technology industry in the region, women barely reach 8%, so the investment will allow us to continue allocating economic resources to the development and professional growth of women tech as a first initiative,” states Talently in its press release.

Following this line, for this financing, BID Lab mobilized funds from the “We-Fi” program, which aims to address the constraints faced by small and medium-sized enterprises run by women in developing countries. 

What does Talently do?

Talently offers a skills enhancement program and the opportunity to access remote work in U.S. technology companies.

The CEO says that, by 2023, they want to consolidate their position as the leading tech talent marketplace in Latin America and that eight months after its launch, they are a benchmark in the region and are growing at a rate of 45% per month. 

Obando adds that they do not have expansion plans but are looking to consolidate in the main countries where they have coverage in terms of talent: Mexico, Peru, Colombia, and Argentina. 

Currently, Talently has the support of BID Lab, 500 Startups, Alaya, Potencia, and Salkantay, among others. In addition, it has placed more than four thousand Latin American programmers in companies such as Pinterest, Rappi, and Nubank.

 

Main image: Adobe Stock.

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