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Don't worry, we speak : Español (Spanish), too!

IDGeo raises over US$171,000 to expand agrotech solutions in Brazil

Don't worry, we speak : Español (Spanish), too!

Contxto – Coffee, soybeans, wheat, rice, corn, sugarcane, cocoa, citrus. These are some common crops in the Brazilian agricultural sector. With annual revenues of over US$84.6 billion, Brazil happens to be the world’s fifth-largest agricultural market.

All too common, though, are farmers struggling to make ends meet. Whether due to relentless bureaucracy, corporate competition, or unsuccessful harvests, there are many challenges that “agricultores” continuously face. 

Assisting farmers is the Brazilian agrotech, IDGeo. Earlier this month, it closed an R$700,000 (approximately US$171,000) investment to expedite its entry in the public market. Behind this deal was the angel investor association, Poli Angels. 

“The choice for IDGeo in this first investment made by Poli Angels was very well-thought out due to the applicability of the solution in the agribusiness segment and the weight that the sector represents for the economy,” said Poli Angels co-founder, Alexandre Aidar.

Previously, IDGeo raised R$1.5 million from FAPESP. Much of its proprietary technology combines agricultural expertise with geo-technology.

IDGeo solutions

With IDGeo, farmers have access to a variety of agrotech solutions, ranging from pest control management, measurement, as well as monitoring. One of its primary products is Mato Control. With this, users can survey, monitor and manage their crops to stay on top of competition through its KPIs (key performance indicators).

Moreover, another one of IDGeo’s products is Cana Viva, which maps out swaths of lands devoted to sugarcane production. Everybody in the supply chain from harvester to shipment providers has the resources they need for smooth operations. 

Considering that Brazil’s agricultural sector comprises 21.1 percent of the country’s GDP, this technology can certainly help industry players perform better. After all, the industry accounts for 38 percent of Brazilian jobs. In this regard, effective land and crop management could certainly take these numbers even further. 

Brazilian agrotechs

Accompanying IDGeo are a miscellany of other Brazilian agrotechs vying for similar levels of market penetration. For urban operations, Pink Farms raised R$2 million (about US$533,000) this past summer to leverage its vertical farming technology and create a new production center. 

On a similar level, this past summer Agrosmart wrapped up a Series A worth US$5.5 million. Over the platform, subscribers can reportedly reduce water consumption by 60 percent and energy spending by 40 percent. 

All in all, these startups are certainly making the massive Brazilian agricultural industry more sustainable and transparent. To learn about other companies developing innovative solutions, be sure to also check out our Brazilian agrotech market map

-JA

Jacob Atkins
Jacob Atkins is a journalist specializing in Latin America. He studied journalism and international relations at American University in Washington, D.C. and has previously reported from Chile, Ecuador, Haiti and Mexico. When he isn't writing he's most likely hiking or drawing.

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